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Digestive Health Center

700 S. Park Street
Madison, WI 53715

Located on the first floor of the Dean & St. Mary's Outpatient Center on the St. Mary's Hospital campus. 

Phone: (608) 229-7575
Toll Free: (877) 229-7575
Fax: (608) 229-7027
Mailing Address: PO Box 259628, Madison, 53725

Procedures

Procedures Performed

The Digestive Health Center in Madison specializes in providing outpatient gastrointestinal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, performed by Dean's Madison-based Gastroenterologists.

The majority of gastrointestinal procedures performed at the Digestive Health Center are done through an endoscope. An endoscope is a small flexible tube with a light and a video camera lens at the end, allowing the gastroenterologist to view the inside of the digestive tract.

Gastroscopy

Patient Booklet: Gastroscopy - Adult (PDF)  
Patient Booklet: Gastroscopy - Pediatric (PDF)  
Patient Booklet: Gastroscopy - Adult, en español (PDF)
Patient Booklet: Gastroscopy - Pediatric, en español (PDF)

Colonoscopy

Patient Booklet: Colonoscopy - Adult (PDF) 
Patient Booklet: Colonoscopy - Pediatric (PDF) 
Patient Booklet: Colonoscopy - Adult, en español (PDF)
Patient Booklet: Colonoscopy - Pediatric, en español (PDF)

Bronchoscopy

Patient Booklet: Bronchoscopy (PDF)

pH Study

Patient Booklet: pH Study (PDF)

General FAQ

What hours are the Digestive Health Center open?

The facility is open Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 pm. (Doors are open at 6:45 a.m.)

The Digestive Health Center has a pre-admission nurse available between 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Monday-Thursday), and 8:30 to 4:00 p.m. (Friday) to obtain a health assessment and answer questions. You may contact him/her, if you wish, toll free at 1-877-229-7575 or locally at (608) 229-7582.

You may also call the Dean on Call nurse at (608) 250-1393 or 1-800-57-NURSE, open 24 hours daily.

Both sites can assist in answering your questions regarding the procedure or your colon prep laxative.

Directions to Digestive Health Center

For a map, please visit our Dean & St. Mary's Outpatient Center page.

If you're driving, note that Hwys 18, 12, 14, 151 and Interstate 90 all intersect with the West Beltline Hwy. From the Beltline, take the Park Street exit traveling north. Merge left onto Park Street and then left on Erin Street. This is the entrance to the St. Mary's campus. Turn at the first left into the parking ramp entrance on Erin St. If you park in the ramp, please bring your parking card in to the Digestive Health Center to be validated. After parking, proceed to the elevator and go to the 1st Floor. Exit the elevator and enter the building. The Digestive Health Center will be located on your left side.

If you are being dropped off, pass the parking ramp entrance on Erin and turn left onto Brooks Street. To the left is a circular driveway in front of the Dean/St. Mary's Outpatient Center with a drop off area. (The driver can then proceed straight ahead into the parking ramp.) You will enter the building and take the West Elevators to the 1st Floor. On the 1st Floor go straight off the elevators - the Digestive Health Center entrance will be on your right.

From Park Street turn on Erin Street. This is the entrance to the St. Mary's campus. Turn at the first left into the parking ramp entrance on Erin Street. If you park in the ramp, please bring your parking card in to the Digestive Health Center to be validated. Both are free services.

What should I bring with me to my procedure?

Have a responsible adult with you upon discharge because you will be given medicine that will make you drowsy during the procedure and you will not be allowed to drive yourself home.

Please bring your insurance card and a photo ID with you. You will also be asked to verify your social security number, but do not need to bring the card with you if you know your number.

Please remember to bring reading glasses if you use them.

You will be asked to change into a hospital gown once you arrive at the Digestive Health Center. For a Colonoscopy, you will be asked to remove underclothing. Slippers are available and a second gown will be given to you to use as a robe.

Please be aware that there may be delays due to emergency situations. Your patience is appreciated. Magazines are available at the Digestive Health Center, but you may bring your own magazine, book or I-pod. Wireless computer access is available.

What should I do if I have billing or insurance questions?

For Insurance Questions: Your insurance company may require prior authorization for the procedure/service being scheduled. Not following this requirement could reduce your benefits and leave you financially responsible. It is your responsibility to contact your insurance company to determine if prior authorization is required prior to receiving the service. Most companies list a phone number on the insurance ID card for you to contact them with questions regarding policy.

For SMDV Facility Fee (billed through St. Mary’s/Dean Ventures)
Questions – call 1-800-222-5962 or (608) 258-1336
**Facility charges include all medications, supplies and nursing services provided while in our facility

For Dean Physician Fee (billed through Dean Clinic)
Questions – call 1-877-434-3326 or (608) 250-1270

For Pathologist Fee - if biopsy is taken
Questions – call 1-888-881-8248

What protocol should I follow regarding my regular daily medications?

1. Blood-thinning medications such as Coumadin (Warfarin) and Plavix MUST be stopped prior to the procedure. This is to lessen the risk of bleeding. The procedure may be canceled if your blood is too thin. Please check with the physician who ordered your blood-thinning medication to be sure it is safe for you to discontinue this medicine.
Coumadin - stop 3 days before the procedure
Plavix - stop 5 days before the procedure
ASA - no need to stop

2. If you take insulin or oral medications for diabetes, you will need to adjust your dosage. You will not be eating or drinking for most of the day. Please discuss this with your primary doctor. If you develop insulin shock due to low blood sugar, you will need to treat it with orange juice or hard candy immediately. Please contact us if this happens so we can determine if the procedure can still be performed. It may need to be rescheduled.

3. You should take your regular morning medicines (EXCEPT Coumadin, Plavix and Insulin) with a small sip of water before 7 a.m. If you have an inhaler(s), nitroglycerin tablets, or medicine you need to take shortly after your exam, please bring these in with you. Avoid taking medicine containing iron for three days prior to the exam, although this is not critical.

4. DO NOT EAT OR DRINK ANYTHING AFTER MIDNIGHT IF YOUR EXAM IS IN THE MORNING, except for your morning medications with a SMALL sip of water. Follow your procedure specific instructions as far as diet.

How soon will I know the results of my procedure?

The proceduralist (physician who performs the exam) will explain the results of your exam toward the end of your recovery period, shortly before you are discharged. However, because of the medications used for sedation during the procedure, it is encouraged that you have a friend or relative present to help you remember what will be explained. The physician may write a summary of the findings on your discharge instruction sheet, may communicate through MyChart or call you the next day.

How soon will I know the results of any biopsies taken?

If any biopsies or cultures are done, the results of these will be sent to you and your primary physician within two weeks of your exam, or you may be asked to call the physician who performed the exam to obtain the results. It takes at least 3 days for the physician to receive results, so if you call his/her office, wait at least 72 hours.

When can I drive after the procedure?

Please be aware that you will be given medicine that will make you drowsy. Therefore, you are not allowed to drive for 12 hours after the procedure, AND you must have a responsible adult with you upon discharge. Also, it is helpful to have your driver remain at the Center during the procedure so the physician will have someone to speak to after the procedure is finished. You should NOT operate machinery, drink alcoholic beverages, or make critical decisions (i.e. sign legal documents) until the following day. We encourage you to rest the remainder of the procedure day. Normal activities may be resumed the following day. You may also return to work the next day.

Reminders

Bring Your Insurance Card and a Form of ID Insurance Card - Please remember to bring your insurance card to simplify the registration process and ensure your records are current. We accept patients with Medicare, Medicaid, and self-pay. We welcome Dean Health Plan and most other major insurance providers.

Form of ID - Please be prepared to provide a photo ID when you check-in for your appointment. We do not need a picture to provide care and will not withhold treatment due to lack of identification. Acceptable forms of ID include Driver's License, State Issued ID, Student ID, Military ID or Proof of Residence (Utility Bill, Bank Statement, Pay Check). Learn more about this enhancement to designed to prevent medical identity theft.

 

Colon FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Colonoscopy

What does a colonoscope look like and how does it work?

The colonoscope is a flexible fiberoptic camera connected to a video processor and light source. The light source illuminates the end of the scope allowing the gastroenterologist to visualize the inside to the lower GI tract (from rectum through entire large intestine, also called large bowel or colon). The video processor allows the picture to be displayed on a monitor screen. The physician will insert air through the scope to expand tissue to assist with visualization.

It is very important that you drink your colon prep as directed until what you expel is completely clear. Clear means it is clear like yellow water but may have "flecks." Also, stool must remain clear. All fecal material must be flushed out of your system. This allows your physician to have a clear view of your colon. Being able to see the colon clearly allows for the best possible examination in the least amount of time and therefore with less sedation.

Can colonoscopy procedures only diagnose problems?

NO! Gastroenterologists not only diagnose disorders involving the large intestine, but can also perform polypectomy (removal of polyps), obtain biopsy specimens, perform intestinal dilation (stretching narrowed areas), and perform hemostasis (stop bleeding) in the GI tract. They can also evaluate, treat and biopsy tumors in the GI tract.

What should I do if I'm scheduled for a colonoscopy and haven't received my colon prep laxative or instructions?

Your prescription laxative is called to the pharmacy of your choice approximately 2-3 weeks prior to your procedure. This prescription will include a Colon Laxative Preparation to drink, and may include a pre-medication (which helps the laxative work). Pick the prep up as soon as possible. Please READ your LAXATIVE PREP INSTRUCTIONS at least TWO DAYS PRIOR to your PROCEDURE because there are some diet restrictions. These are mailed to you from the Digestive Health Center, but if you have not received them at least 1 week prior to your procedure, PLEASE CALL (608) 229-7575 or toll free at 1-877-229-7575. Please follow your prep instructions carefully as this will help determine how clean your colon is for the exam.

What can I do to prevent "sore bottom" while following my colon prep laxative instructions?

Some people experience a "sore bottom" once the prep laxative begins working. Some things you can do to alleviate this discomfort are to keep area clean and dry by:
• Soaking in tub of warm water then gently pat area dry, do not rub.
• Gently washing area with warm water and wash cloth then gently pat area dry, do not rub.
• Use commercial wipes to clean area (e.g.., baby wipes, adult sanitary wipes, Tucks hemorrhoidal pads with witch hazel, can be very comforting.)
• Just before starting prep apply K-Y Jelly. DO NOT use zinc-based ointment or Vaseline.
• Use hemorrhoidal ointment if you have hemorrhoids.

How will I feel after the colonoscopy procedure?

People respond differently to procedural sedation. Occasionally people feel moderately awake and alert, however most people remain drowsy for the remainder of the day. Because of the sedation, most people do not completely remember all of the details surrounding the examination and recovery period.

You may experience gas discomfort. This is usually helped by walking, and is usually gone by the following morning.

If the IV site is tender, apply a warm compress to the area for five to ten minutes, four times a day. Your physician should be notified if this does not get better in 1 to 2 days.

You will not be allowed to drive yourself home, AND you must have a responsible adult with you upon discharge. You should NOT operate machinery, drink alcoholic beverages, or make critical decisions (i.e. sign legal documents) until the following day.

Normal activities may be resumed the following day. You may also return to work the next day.

What complications should I watch for after my colonoscopy procedure?

Watch for the following complications:
1. You develop a fever over 100° F or develop shaking chills.
2. You develop new, severe, or increasing pain in your abdomen, chest, or neck.
3. You begin to vomit.
4. Your bowel movements are bloody, or turn black or maroon in color.
5. You become light headed or dizzy.
6. You develop shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

If you experience any of these complications, please call Dean Gastroenterology at (608) 260-3405. If it's after business hours, please call the Dean on Call nurse at (608) 250-1393 or 1-800-57-NURSE.

What are the American Cancer Society guidelines for colorectal cancer screening?

Options for colorectal screening may be chosen based on individual risk, personal preference, and access.

Average risk adults should begin screening at age 50 years.

Use the guide below to help you discuss with your health care professional which ONE of the screening options below is best for you.

Tests that Find Pre-Cancer AND Cancer:
Colonoscopy - every 10 years
Flexible sigmoidoscopy - every 5 years *
Virtual colonoscopy (CT colonography) - every 5 years *
Double contrast barium - enema every 5 years *

Tests that Mainly Find Cancer:
Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) - every year **
Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) - every year **
Stool DNA test (sDNA) - ask health care professional **

* All abnormal virtual colonoscopy and double contrast barium enema results as well as positive Flexible sigmoidoscopy, FOBT, FIT or sDNA tests should be followed up by a colonoscopy.

** The multiple stool (fecal) take home test should be used. One test done by the doctor in the office is not adequate for testing.

Gastro FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Gastroscopy

(Gastroscopy is also referred to as Upper Endoscopy, EGD or Esophagogastroduodenoscopy)

What does a gastroscope look like and how does it work?

The gastroscope is a flexible fiberoptic camera connected to a video processor and light source. The light source illuminates the end of the scope allowing the gastroenterologist to visualize the inside to the upper GI tract (esophagus, stomach and upper part of the small intestine). The video processor allows the picture to be displayed on a monitor screen. The physician will insert air through the scope to expand tissue to assist with visualization.

Can gastroscopy procedures only diagnose problems?

NO! Gastroenterologists not only diagnose and perform surveillance of disorders involving the esophagus, stomach and first part of the small intestine, but can also perform polypectomy (removal of polyps), obtain biopsy specimens, perform dilation (stretching narrowed areas), and perform hemostasis (stop bleeding) in the upper GI tract. They can also evaluate, treat and biopsy tumors.

What should I do regarding my diet prior to the gastroscopy?

Morning Procedure: Do not eat or drink anything after midnight if your exam is in the morning – except for your morning medications with a small sip of water.

Afternoon Procedure:  For Procedures 12:30 pm or later, you may have only a clear liquid breakfast before 8:00 am.

Clear Liquids include:  Water, Fruit juice without pulp (apple, white grape), Lemonade, Clear broth, or Tea (without milk or creamer), 7-UP, Sprite, Gatorade and Popsicles. AVOID any clear liquids that are RED or PURPLE in color.

How will I feel after the gastroscopy?

People respond differently to procedural sedation. Occasionally people feel moderately awake and alert, however most people remain drowsy for the remainder of the day. Because of the sedation, most people do not completely remember all of the details surrounding the examination and recovery period.

You may experience gas discomfort. This is usually helped by walking, and is usually gone by the following morning.

If you had a gastroscopy, your throat may be sore for one to two days after the procedure. Gargling with warm salt water may relieve some of this discomfort.

If the IV site is tender, apply a warm compress to the area for five to ten minutes, four times a day. Your physician should be notified if this does not get better in 1 to 2 days.

You will not be allowed to drive yourself home, AND you must have a responsible adult with you upon discharge. You should NOT operate machinery, drink alcoholic beverages, or make critical decisions (i.e. sign legal documents) until the following day.

Normal activities may be resumed the following day. You may also return to work the next day.

What complications should I watch for after my gastroscopy procedure?

Watch for the following complications:
• You develop a fever over 100° F or develop shaking chills.
• You develop new, severe, or increasing pain in your abdomen, chest, or neck.
• You begin to vomit.
• Your bowel movements are bloody, or turn black or maroon in color.
• You become light headed or dizzy.
• You develop shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

If you experience any of these complications, please call Dean Gastroenterology at (608) 260-3405. If it's after business hours, please call the Dean on Call nurse at (608) 250-1393 or 1-800-57-NURSE.

Broncho FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Bronchoscopy

What does a bronchoscope look like and how does it work?

The bronchoscope is a flexible fiberoptic camera connected to a video processor and light source. The light source illuminates the end of the scope allowing the Pulmonologist to visualize the airway (through the trachea into the bronchi of the lung). The video processor allows the picture to be displayed on a monitor screen. The physician may insert the scope through the nose or mouth.

Can bronchoscopy procedures only diagnose problems?

A bronchoscopy can be done for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons which may include:
• To view abnormalities of the airway (abnormal chest x-ray or CT scan)
• To obtain tissue specimens of the lung
• To evaluate and treat growths in the airway
• To obtain tissue or mucous samples to diagnose lung disease
• To evaluate bleeding in the lungs, possible lung cancer, a chronic cough, hoarseness or a collapsed lung
• To remove secretions, blood or foreign objects lodged in the airway

What should I do regarding my Diet prior to the bronchoscopy?

Morning Procedure: Do not eat or drink anything after midnight if your exam is in the morning – except for your morning medications with a small sip of water.

Afternoon Procedure:  For Procedures 12:30 pm or later, you may have a clear liquid breakfast before 8:00 am.

Clear Liquids include:  Water, Fruit juice without pulp (apple, white grape), Lemonade, Clear broth, or Tea (without milk or creamer), 7-UP, Sprite, Gatorade and Popsicles.

How will I feel after the bronchoscopy?

People respond differently to procedural sedation. Occasionally people feel moderately awake and alert, however most people remain drowsy for the remainder of the day. Because of the sedation, most people do not completely remember all of the details surrounding the examination and recovery period.

You should not eat or drink anything immediately after the procedure until you are able to swallow without choking.

DO NOT SMOKE for at least 24 hours after the exam.

You may experience a sore throat for one to two days after the procedure. Gargling with warm salt water or sucking on throat lozenges may relieve some of this discomfort.

Local anesthetics used to numb the airway may leave a bitter taste in your mouth.  Your mouth may also feel very dry for several hours immediately after the procedure.

If a biopsy was taken, you may notice small specks of blood in your sputum; this should be gone by the next day.

Fever is common but should not exceed 101 degrees F and should only last 24 hours or less.  Tylenol should help significantly. 

If the IV site is tender, apply a warm compress to the area for five to ten minutes, four times a day. Your physician should be notified if this does not get better in 1 to 2 days.

You will not be allowed to drive yourself home, AND you must have a responsible adult with you upon discharge. You should NOT operate machinery, drink alcoholic beverages, or make critical decisions (i.e. sign legal documents) until the following day.

Normal activities may be resumed the following day. You may also return to work the next day.

What complications should I watch for after my bronchoscopy procedure?

Watch for the following complications:
• You develop a high fever over 101° F or your fever persists for greater than 24 hours
• You are coughing up excessive amounts of blood (2 Tbsp or greater)
• You develop chest pain, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing 

If you experience any of these complications, please call Dean Pulmonology at (608) 260-2945. If it's after business hours, please call the Dean on Call nurse at (608) 250-1393 or 1-800-57-NURSE.

Share Your Feedback

If you recently received care at one of our Day Surgery Centers, we'd like to hear from you.

Please fill out our Surgery Center Concerns & Compliments form.

Videos - Tour, Overviews

A short video on St. Mary's YouTube channel provides a tour of the Digestive Center.

Also, we recommend you watch the following videos from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, which provide an overview of the procedures:

Upper Endoscopy/Gastroscopy

Colonoscopy

Proud to be Accredited by the Joint Commission

We're proud to share that the Davis Duehr Dean Surgery Center and the Surgery and Care Center/Digestive Health Center have received the Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval.

This seal demonstrates that these teams have met standards of care specific to the needs of patients, including infection prevention and control, leadership and medication management.

Patient Rights and Responsibilities

Healing involves the coordination and cooperation of many caring specialties. You, the patient, are an important and essential part of the team working to provide you with the best care.

We invite you to read our Patient Rights and Responsibility documents for:

Surgery & Care Center

Digestive Care Center

Davis Duehr Dean Surgery

You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view these documents.